Tag Archives: ozarks

The Ozarks: Abandoned

Living in The Ozarks has been key to my development as an artist. The color, seasons, textures and characters of The Ozark Mountains makes it all come together. It’s history and it’s people are what inspire me. Photo journalism is

Galena, James River and Charlie Barnes

Galena was platted in 1852, and named for deposits of the ore galena near the original town site. A post office has been in operation at Galena since 1853 and the last public execution in Missouri took place in Galena

Bralley Civil War Cemetery

Just outside Seymour, MO sits the Bralley Civil War Cemetery. According to a small plaque at the entrance, The Jonothan Smythe Bralley family moved from Virginia to The James River near Galloway, MO in Greene County around 1835. In about

Amish of Webster County

From the Greater Seymour Chamber Of Commerce: The Amish of Webster County The Amish in Webster County, Missouri, are resisting the progress of the 21st century. They are “Old Order Amish,” which means plain ways—buggies with no tops, no enclosed

Potholes in the Mother Road Vol. 1

The Birthplace of Route 66 Cyrus Avery of Tulsa is known worldwide as the “Father of Route 66.” Springfield, Missouri, is known as the “Birthplace of Route 66.” By 1923, there were 148 miles of street in the city, 60

Kindall’s General Store

Kindall’s old General Store is one of the oldest continuously operated businesses in the Ozarks. The Old Store has been serving generations for well over 60 years. The business, situated in front of the majestic and scenic Ozark Mountains, continues

Saying Goodbye To Old Friends in Halltown

At the height of Route 66 Halltown had roughly 20 businesses which included three grocery stores, a drugstore, a blacksmith shop, service station, garage, and a variety store. Today, Halltown has a few surviving businesses. It’s boarded up store fronts

2018 Abandoned Calendar On Sale

Just finished up the Abandoned in the Ozarks Calendar for 2018 just follow this link to get yours! Photos from across the Ozarks places like Galena, Protem, Cane Hill, Brighton, Greenfield and Bona to name a few. It’s a collection

Tractors Gone Wild

Within the first few decades, tractor use was slow to catch on. Yet once farmers realized the benefits that could be had in tractor-driven farming, popularity soared. There was no need for cumbersome manual labor when a simple machine like

Bennett Spring State Park

Bennett Spring and its valley have attracted visitors since the mid-19th century. Settlers found the spring-fed streams to be ideal locations for their grist and flour mills and the wilderness around the stream was perfect for hunting. James Brice was